Signing Off – Race Chair Mike on running his first RFTC for his mom, Mollie Gavigan

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(Brothers Joe, Race Chair Mike, and Bill… Thank you Shawna Long for taking this photo)

A bunch of my family drove in from Nashville, TN to celebrate my mom Mollie Gavigan and my grandmother Molly Burd. We lost both to breast cancer. We were also celebrating my new “cousin-in-law’s” mom Lizzy Bearden who also lost her life to breast cancer.

Your first Race for the Cure, you do it for you, someone you love, someone you lost or just because someone asked you to come.

As the race goes on, as you see those survivors clad in pink, the dancing firemen, funny team shirts, pink wigs, you realize it’s bigger than just you. You realize that we all come downtown as one for each other, for a common goal to someday make this world cancer free.

I loved Saturday. I love the event and everything it stands for. My brothers and my uncle and I all ran together. We hammed it up with all the bands, the cheerleaders, the firemen, all of the amazing groups cheering us and all the participants. We crossed the finish line together with big smiles and saluted our mom.

Then a young lady came up to us and said that she had been running behind us for the whole Race. That this was her first Race after her last treatment. She said that we helped her have fun and that she loved our antics. Well, the waterworks almost started flowing again, but I was finally out of tears. I wish I knew her name, because her nice words put a perfect bow on our run together.

So, we all did, we all went ALL IN for those we loved, each other and those we want to celebrate more birthdays. I cannot wait for next October so I can do it all over again. BUT this time for Race Chair Ashley.

Signing off – Race Chair Mike

- Race chair mike

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How a 3x survivor mom saved her 26 yr old daughter, who saved her 29 yr old sister.

Yesterday Becky Hale and her daughters Lindsay Hale Bender and Devon Hale spoke at our Race Committee meeting.

Becky was first diagnosed with breast cancer around 20 years ago, caught it early and was able to carry on with her life.  That is until she found breast cancer again.  Like the first time, she caught it early and thought she was in the clear.  Well, she found it a third time a few years later, and this time is was more serious.  She had to go through chemo and radiation, but she kicked it again, and now is in remission.  And loving life.

Enter her daughter Devon, 26 years old.  Through her own vigilance and the knowledge of her mother’s struggles with breast cancer, she found a lump, and it too was cancerous.  The day after she went into remission, her 29 year old sister Lindsay was given bad news.  She too had breast cancer.

Lindsay had seen her mom’s experience, been there and supported her sister Devon, so she had gone to her doctors to have a series of tests expecting to have a preventive mastectomy.  Once there, the doctors found cancer in both breasts.

This family has faced breast cancer 5 too many times.  The daughters are too young, and no mom should have to battle 3 times herself.  Through their support for each other and especially their vigilance, they helped save each other’s life.

I know many women regardless if they can afford healthcare or not, just choose not to regularly check themselves.  Sometimes out of lack of knowledge, or fear of the result, or unfortunately inconvenience.  I hope the story of the Hale women will impact someone out there to start checking regularly, see their doctors., and spread the message to their friends and family.

Thank you Becky, Devon and Lindsay for sharing your story.  Look for them on KARK tomorrow morning at 6:45am.

- Race Chair Mike, register at http://www.komenarkanas.org or the Race Space in the Pleasant Ridge shopping center on Cantrell Rd.

Social Media 101, What is #KomenAR, heck, what is a hashtag???

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Social Media 101, What is #KomenAR, heck, what is a hashtag???

Are you #ALLIN this year for the #KomenAR 20th Anny #R4TC?

If you are on Facebook or have even dipped your social media “toes” into Twitter you have probably noticed a higher number of things called hashtags being used. “WHY?” may you ask is that being done? Well, in this world of more and more media coverage, #KomenAR wants to increase their profile to the world. That can translate to more dollars for the important things that Susan G. Komen seeks to do while educating and entertaining the general public. WIN! WIN! Right?

So if you are on Facebook, share our posts on your page, and if you are on Twitter please Retweet our tweets. Spreading the word on social media is another tool we have to eradicate Breast Cancer in our lifetimes!

Hashtag defined: (summarized from urbandictionary.com)
If you have been on Twitter, you may have seen a “hashtag.” To put it simply, a hash tag is simply a way for people to search for tweets that have a common topic and to begin a conversation. For example, if you search on #KomenAR (or #komenar or #KOMENar, because it’s not case-sensitive), you’ll get a list of tweets related to the Komen Arkansas because Komen Arkansas has selected the hashtag #KomenAR as their designated hashtag for all things related to the Komen Arkansas Race for the Cure.

Train for the Cure – Week 6 “Race Week” by Coach Leah

Race week is here!! Can you believe it? I imagine some of your minds have already started buzzing with pre-race jitters and a landslide of “what ifs”….what if it’s cold? what if it’s hot? what if I trip? what if I have to use the bathroom and miss the race start? what if I get lost? what if I get tired? I’ll give you a few of my best pre-race tips to help things go smoothly, but above all I want to tell you to try to not be afraid of what could happen and instead be excited about what will happen.  Every race is an adventure. Some days are perfect, others are challenging, but each one makes memories and shapes who we are as runners. Treasure the experience, whatever the outcome.

A few easy tips to help your morning run smoothly:

 1. Lay out everything you will need the night before. Make a checklist:    

    Race bib/timing chip if you have one

    Shoes

    Water bottle

 2. Check the forecast and plan your apparel accordingly

   If it is cold, disposable gloves/hat/shirt are good to have to keep warm pre race

   If it is unusually warm, plan to carry extra fluids, and wear light fabric in light colors so that it will not attract sunlight

 3. Give yourself plenty of time, and plan to leave early.

   This is a very large race, expect to have to park and walk a ways, plan ahead so you won’t feel rushed.

    Have a reunion area planned for fellow runners and friends, again, this is a very large race

 4. HAVE FUN!

    While this is a huge accomplishment and a veery meaningful event, at the end of the day…it’s just a 5k, don’t stress it!

 Congratulations! I am very proud of your dedication to completing the Train for the Cure program, and thank you for letting me run my mouth with what hopefully were some useful bits of advice. In closing out this program, I want to leave you with a quote that has become one of my favorites. It was written by a runner in her blog following the Boston Marathon.

 “Runners are tough, and resilient. When we train, we put in months of work. We voluntarily put out bodies, minds, and spirits through tests of sometimes nightmarish rigor. We have bad runs, and get over them. We have injuries, and get over them. We soil ourselved in every way imaginable, and see others doing the same, and we get over it. We share water, food, toilet paper, elation, and despair. We keep on running.”

I wish you all the very best of luck on Saturday

 Train for the Cure: Week Six of Online Training

Tuesday: walk briskly for 1 minute, run 9 minutes. Continue this pattern for 30 minutes. 

Thursday: walk briskly for 1 minute, run 9 minutes. Continue this pattern for 30 minutes. 

Saturday: THE BIG DANCE!! Party like it’s your birthday, and hug every survivor you can!

Finish Line Photo Stations are Back!

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Finish Line Photo Stations are Back!

Last year, we had almost 40,000 peopl who participated in the Arkansas Race for the Cure. Given that there were that many people in attendance, there had to be at least double that in photo opportunities. Last year for the first time – we tried to help you capture some of those special memories. Whether it’s finishing your first 5K or celebrating a milestone as a survivor. Komen Arkansas has joined with Bedford Camera & Video to provide FREE professional pictures at the 2K and 5K finish lines. This year, we will also be at the Kid’s Area as well. Please stop by and take advantage of their services. You will be able to go online several days after the race and purchase copies of the photographs. A portion of the proceeds will go to Komen Arkansas.

Pink Roots Bake Sale – MCHS Warriors

This is from Chelsea Kay Gann.  I ripped it all these from a Facebook message exchange we had with her.  Thank you so much Chelsea!!!

Here’s Chelsey Kae Gann

My hospital has a team in the race. MCHS WARRIORS! I’m the co-captain so I made 2 cakes and we had a silent auction during our bake sale. My cakes added $100 to our total. 

I also made these. You can post them too if you want. There were 50 and we sold them at $2 each so that was another $100!
 
 
 

 

 

I also saw on the website where ya’ll gave the idea to make your own donation jars. This was ours that we set out at the bake sale. It’s made out of a peanut butter jar.  I love seeing all the PINK.
 
Way to go Chelsea, you rock!